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K5 snaps up all non-US rights to drama starring Olivia Wilde and Luke Wilson.

K5 International has taken international rights to Tribeca Competition title Meadowland ahead of the film’s world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 17.

The film marks the directorial debut of cinematographer Reed Morano in her and centres on Sarah (Olivia Wilde) and Phil (Luke Wilson) whose life is shattered when their son goes missing. As months pass with little information, they each struggle in their own way to cope.

The supporting cast includes Giovanni Ribisi, Elisabeth Moss, John Leguizamo, Kevin Corrigan, Merritt Wever and Juno Temple.

The film is a Bron Studios production in association with Creative Wealth Media Finance.

The film is directed by Morano, written by Chris Rossi, and produced by Olivia Wilde, Margot Hand, Matt Tauber and Bron’s Aaron L. Gilbert.  It is co-produced by Chris Rossi and Erika Hampson.  Executive producers are Jennifer Levine, Jason Cloth, Alex Garcia, Santiago Garcia Galvan, Marla Rand, Scott Paterson and Lauren Selig.

K5 also has the rights to three other films world premiering at Tribeca: Stephen Fingleton’s dystopian thriller The Survivalist, which plays in competition; Neil LaBute’s Dirty Weekend, starring Matthew Broderick and Alice Eve; and Robert Edwards’ When I Live My Life Over Again, starring Christopher Walken.

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EXCLUSIVE: Mr. Turner actor Timothy Spall is to star in Away, the fifth collaboration between producer Terry Stone and international sales agent Cinema Management Group (CMG).

Juno Temple will also headline the drama from Stone’s Gateway Films and Ratio Film. CMG chief Edward Noeltner is introducing Away to buyers in Berlin this week and holds world rights while the producers retain the UK.

David Blair will direct the Blackpool-set story about a widower who saves an orphan on the run from a drug dealer, sparking an unlikely friendship. Production is scheduled for an early March shoot mostly on location.

Spall’s recent best British actor win in London follows solid recognition for his performance in Mr Turner that has delivered a British Independent Film Awards nomination and the best actor prize in Cannes last May, among others.

“I am thrilled that Cinema Management Group will be handling the international sales for Away at this year’s Berlin Film Festival,” said Stone. “We are very proud of the story that we are telling with Away, as well as the team behind it, and feel that it will stand up very well at this competitive market.”

Turner added: “Our recent collaboration with David Blair, Terry Stone, CMG and Gateway bore fruit with the recent completion of The Messenger. We’re looking forward to working with the same team on Away and are excited to be working with one of the UK’s top acting talents in Timothy Spall and Juno Temple.”

CMG is screening The Messenger in the market today (February 5) and on February 8.

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Films > (2015) Safelight > Trailer




If you haven’t heard of Juno Temple yet, you soon will.
The up-and-coming British actress starred opposite Angelina Jolie in the summer blockbuster “Maleficent” and has a role beside Johnny Depp in the upcoming Whitey Bulger flick, “Black Mass.”
Part of a crop of hot young actresses making a name in Hollywood and the indie film world, the 25-year-old actress was singled out last year by the public, which voted to award her the EE Rising Star BAFTA Award.
“There are some truly extraordinary young women actresses right now, like Jennifer Lawrence, Mia Wasikowska, Elizabeth Olsen,” the Somerset, England-born actress told her “Horns” co-star, Daniel Radcliffe, for the inaugural issue of Heroine magazine. “You watch them and you forget sometimes that you’re even watching them. They are so young but know the craft in such an old way, and I love that so much. So if the job doesn’t go your way, you’re just as excited to see the film anyway.”

But lately, things have been going Temple’s way, like adopting a Boston accent to play opposite Depp.
“Johnny Depp playing Whitey Bulger was just one of the most amazing transitions I’ve ever seen,” she told Radcliffe for Heroine. “He had these crazy contact lenses in his eyes that almost reminded me of lizards, so when you were acting with him you were genuinely quite frightened, but he was lovely, so encouraging.”
Here are five things you need to know about Temple:
She Comes From a Rebel Family
Her father, Julien Temple, a fan of punk music, directed the 1979 Sex Pistols documentary “The Great Rock and Roll Swindle,” as well as videos for The Rolling Stones and The Kinks. Her aunt, Nina Temple, was the last secretary of the British Communist Party, and her grandfather, Langdon Temple, once ran a travel agency specializing in Communist countries.
She Grew Up in a Fairytale House
Temple grew up with her father, mother Amanda Pirie, a producer, and two younger brothers in a 14th century house in Taunton, Somerset.
“As kids, we lived in this magical world and roamed free in the gardens,” she told The Telegraph earlier this year. “I was constantly in fancy dress and in character as a kid.”
No surprise, then, that Temple has a thing for fairies and flipped when she got the chance to play one beside Jolie, even if most of her time on set was spent filming in a “giant white room wearing a wet suit with ping pong balls all over it,” as she told Heroine. “I had all these ink dots all over my face and I was filming with a 10-foot-tall version of Angelina Jolie’s face.”
She Got Started as Child Actress
It’s no surprise, given her childhood, that Temple announced to her parents that she wanted to become an actress. Her first role, at 8, was in one of her father’s films. At age 12, she auditioned and won the role of Cate Blanchett’s sulky teenage daughter in “Notes on a Scandal.” By the time she left boarding school, she had worked on 11 films, and her co-star in “St Trinian’s 2: The Legend of Fratton’s Gold,” Rupert Everett, helped her write her essay for completing her secondary education.
Though she’s 25, Temple can still look like a child actress.
“I’m still at a stage where sometimes I look 18,” she told Radcliffe. “Some days people tell me I look 14, which is a bit of a shock … and then sometimes I look 25.”
She Prefers Character to Leading Lady Roles
Temple has already been cast in more than 30 film roles, including a 12-year-old girl whose virginity is offered as collateral to Matthew McConaughey’s hit man, a schizophrenic insomniac and a woman who is raped and murdered.
“I usually like to play a woman who’s got s*** going on,” she told The Telegraph. “I’m not sure I ooze leading lady, I’m not the high school catch. I’ve been lucky with characters.”
Her Boyfriend Is a Fellow Actor
Temple lives with her boyfriend, actor Michael Angarano, whom she met on the set of 2012′s “Brass Teapot,” in a 1920s Los Angeles bungalow filled with vintage clothes and British flags. According to The Telegraph, she once collected Angarano from the airport in nothing but underwear, heels and a raincoat.

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As Juno Temple and I sit outside at Los Angeles’ Burbank studios to discuss her role in Disney’s Maleficent, a crow swoops down like a dark shadow over us and lands, menacingly, on our table, its black iridescent wings outstretched. In the Californian sunshine, this aerial assault is so timely, it’s as if the studio has engineered it for us. “It’s Maleficent!” Temple cries, her eyes widening in cartoon-style, “Like Angelina Jolie is present.”
The 24-year-old British actress stars as the young fairy Thistletwit, alongside a winged and horned Jolie, in the revisionist tale about the Mistress of All Evil from Disney’s original 1959 Sleeping Beauty. Whether you think the film, directed by special effects guru Robert Stromberg, is a triumph or something slightly short of that, the casting is spot on. Jolie is a dead ringer for the dark queen, even without visual enhancements; and the mental leap from Temple, tiny and ethereal in a dinky lilac vintage dress before me, to a bonkers, teenage pixie is small. She’s like a sprite in beaten-up biker boots; and she says she feels an affinity to fairies too. “I had this imaginary world where fairies were my friends. If you told six year-old Juno that she’d one day play a Disney fairy, she’d totally freak out,” she enthuses at an alarming speed, her Somerset-bred accent now submerged in thick, twangy Los Angelino (she has been a city resident since 2008). Her vocal pitch and perpetual sense of wonder could still be mistaken for a six-year old’s. “I still have one foot in that magical world. I never want to lose that.”
If taken on first impressions alone, it might be easy to dismiss Temple as a gushy, Bonnie Langford type, a child star trapped in the body of a woman (she started acting when she was eight). But this would be a mistake. In her career, which has already spanned 32 feature films and an EE Rising Star Bafta awarded last year, Temple has shown a taste for darkly complex, unstable female characters which she has embraced with emotional maturity.
After early turns as spiky, petulant school girls in films like Notes on a Scandal in 2002 – a part she won at her first professional audition – and Joe Wright’s adaptation of Ian McEwan’s Atonement in 2007, she has explored the borders of the female psyche in mainly independent films.
She has played a 12-year-old Texan trailer trash girl whose virginity is offered as collateral to a hitman in Killer Joe; a stripper-cum-sex worker in Afternoon Delight; a lesbian lycanthrope in Jack and Diane; a schizophrenic insomniac in Magic Magic; and the murdered girlfriend of a man with Satanic powers, played by Daniel Radcliffe, in Horns out later this year. That’s more edgy, challenging roles than most actresses take on in a lifetime.
“I usually like to play a woman who’s got s— going on,” she tells me. “I’m not sure I ooze leading lady, I’m not the high school catch. I’ve been lucky with characters, but some are real headf—-.” She talks as if she’s on fast forward. “That’s why it’s so important to have a director you trust, who can bring your feet back to earth when you’re weeping in a hole after being beaten up.” She remembers Joe Wright reassuring her, when, at 16, she was left traumatised by the sexual abuse scene in Atonement: “Your character is f—ed up, but Juno’s okay.” She says now: “I’ve had to do a couple of rape scenes and they’re f—ing rough. There’s a brutal one in Horns, then I have to play dead. I’m not good at it because I have an overactive vein in my neck. It’s screaming: ‘I’m not ready to die yet!’”

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Juno Temple has appeared in more than 30 movies since starting her career in earnest with “Notes on a Scandal” in 2006.

This summer, the busy 24-year-old has two coming out: the refocused Sleeping Beauty story “Maleficent” (May 30) and comic book noir “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” (Aug. 22).

Both were major technical shoots, a newish thing for the English actress who, despite the occasional “Dark Knight Rises,” tends to favor down-and-dirty indie projects such as “Killer Joe,” “Lovelace” and “Afternoon Delight.”

“We did motion capture,” Temple says of her “Maleficent” job as Thistlewit, a ditzy teenage pixie who annoys her older cohorts, played by fellow Brits Lesley Manville and Imelda Staunton. “It was such a trippy experience for me because I’ve never done a lot of green screen before and this is a whole other realm of making a movie. You’re just in one big room with loads and loads of cameras, and you have to wear these strange wetsuits that are covered in what are like shiny golf balls. Then we had to wear head cameras and be on wires and stuff.”

She loved flitting about with Staunton and Manville, but didn’t get much face time with the film’s star, Angelina Jolie — depending, that is, on one’s definition of face time.

“I met with Angelina briefly, and she was so great and so cool and so lovely,” Temple reports. “But I didn’t get to do any filming with her, no. I filmed with a giant, Styrofoam version of her.”

Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller’s sequel to their superstylized, hardboiled crime drama “Sin City” also required the actors to work under green screen circumstances for demanding 3-D cameras. Temple, who plays one of the film’s many molls, is confident that the viewing effect will be totally worth it.

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Getting work certainly doesn’t seem to be a problem for Juno Temple. At 24, the pixie-like daughter of filmmaker Julien Temple and producer Amanda Pirie, has already been involved in around 30 movies, ranging from independent projects including Kaboom, Killer Joe and Afternoon Delight to blockbusters such as The Dark Knight Rises and Disney’s forthcoming epic Maleficent.

Inauspiciously, her father excised her first performance from his 1998 film, Vigo: A Passion for Life, although she made the final cut of his next movie, Pandaemonium. ‘As a child, getting to do films like that was just a great excuse to be around my dad,’ says Juno. ‘He was away for a lot of my childhood and I missed him, so that was always an exciting prospect.’

When she was 14, she told her parents she wanted to be an actress. ‘They were both pretty nervous about it. They went, “Really? Shit.”’ They were worried how she’d cope with rejection. ‘I still call my mum or dad in tears about not getting jobs,’ she admits. ‘I’m so invested in this that it really hurts when I don’t get a job I really want. And then it is extreme jubilation when I do.’

Her father, who’s known for his music documentaries including The Filth and the Fury about the Sex Pistols; The Future is Unwritten on Clash front man Joe Strummer; and Oil City Confidential, the story of Essex’s Dr Feelgood, told her to never compromise herself. ‘He said to me, “Don’t do anything unless you’re passionate about it. Just don’t. Whether it’s five months or five minutes of your time, just don’t do anything that you aren’t going to be passionate about every second that you’re doing it.” And so I really, really stick with that.’

This commitment is evident on screen. In her latest release, Magic Magic, she throws herself fully into the role of a fragile young American who experiences some kind of mental breakdown during a trip to Chile. ‘It was definitely a role that I don’t think you could be half-arsed about,’ says Juno. ‘You had to not be afraid and just go for it.’

She used to find it difficult to separate herself from her characters and suggests that doing Magic Magic that way could have been damaging. ‘God knows where I would be. I could have lost my mind and I could be anywhere right now.’ The turning point came when she worked with the director Joe Wright on Atonement. ‘He told me that you don’t have to fuck yourself up to bring tears on camera. You can get too involved with a character and that was a major piece of advice that I took away with me. I think as I have gotten older, I have got much better at letting go of a character when I finish the movie.’

Ultimately, it’s essential to remain grounded, she says. ‘It’s so important that you go back to reality and be with your best friends and with your family. I love film and I love acting but it’s about the work for me. And this is work for me. It’s a job. I don’t want it to be my entire life.’

Magic Magic is released Fri 18 Apr.

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