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As Juno Temple and I sit outside at Los Angeles’ Burbank studios to discuss her role in Disney’s Maleficent, a crow swoops down like a dark shadow over us and lands, menacingly, on our table, its black iridescent wings outstretched. In the Californian sunshine, this aerial assault is so timely, it’s as if the studio has engineered it for us. “It’s Maleficent!” Temple cries, her eyes widening in cartoon-style, “Like Angelina Jolie is present.”
The 24-year-old British actress stars as the young fairy Thistletwit, alongside a winged and horned Jolie, in the revisionist tale about the Mistress of All Evil from Disney’s original 1959 Sleeping Beauty. Whether you think the film, directed by special effects guru Robert Stromberg, is a triumph or something slightly short of that, the casting is spot on. Jolie is a dead ringer for the dark queen, even without visual enhancements; and the mental leap from Temple, tiny and ethereal in a dinky lilac vintage dress before me, to a bonkers, teenage pixie is small. She’s like a sprite in beaten-up biker boots; and she says she feels an affinity to fairies too. “I had this imaginary world where fairies were my friends. If you told six year-old Juno that she’d one day play a Disney fairy, she’d totally freak out,” she enthuses at an alarming speed, her Somerset-bred accent now submerged in thick, twangy Los Angelino (she has been a city resident since 2008). Her vocal pitch and perpetual sense of wonder could still be mistaken for a six-year old’s. “I still have one foot in that magical world. I never want to lose that.”
If taken on first impressions alone, it might be easy to dismiss Temple as a gushy, Bonnie Langford type, a child star trapped in the body of a woman (she started acting when she was eight). But this would be a mistake. In her career, which has already spanned 32 feature films and an EE Rising Star Bafta awarded last year, Temple has shown a taste for darkly complex, unstable female characters which she has embraced with emotional maturity.
After early turns as spiky, petulant school girls in films like Notes on a Scandal in 2002 – a part she won at her first professional audition – and Joe Wright’s adaptation of Ian McEwan’s Atonement in 2007, she has explored the borders of the female psyche in mainly independent films.
She has played a 12-year-old Texan trailer trash girl whose virginity is offered as collateral to a hitman in Killer Joe; a stripper-cum-sex worker in Afternoon Delight; a lesbian lycanthrope in Jack and Diane; a schizophrenic insomniac in Magic Magic; and the murdered girlfriend of a man with Satanic powers, played by Daniel Radcliffe, in Horns out later this year. That’s more edgy, challenging roles than most actresses take on in a lifetime.
“I usually like to play a woman who’s got s— going on,” she tells me. “I’m not sure I ooze leading lady, I’m not the high school catch. I’ve been lucky with characters, but some are real headf—-.” She talks as if she’s on fast forward. “That’s why it’s so important to have a director you trust, who can bring your feet back to earth when you’re weeping in a hole after being beaten up.” She remembers Joe Wright reassuring her, when, at 16, she was left traumatised by the sexual abuse scene in Atonement: “Your character is f—ed up, but Juno’s okay.” She says now: “I’ve had to do a couple of rape scenes and they’re f—ing rough. There’s a brutal one in Horns, then I have to play dead. I’m not good at it because I have an overactive vein in my neck. It’s screaming: ‘I’m not ready to die yet!’”

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The new adaptation of Far From The Madding Crowd may not be see in cinemas until summer 2015.

That’s the latest word from Fox Searchlight Pictures about the movie part shot in Sherborne and starring the likes of Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts, Michael Sheen, Tom Sturridge and Juno Temple.

Fox Searchlight has suggested that the release date will be May 1, 2015.

Based on the literary classic by Thomas Hardy, Far From the Madding Crowd is the story of independent, beautiful and headstrong Bathsheba Everdene (Mulligan), who attracts three very different suitors: Gabriel Oak (Matthias Schoenaerts), a sheep farmer, captivated by her fetching willfulness; Frank Troy (Tom Sturridge), a handsome and reckless Sergeant; and William Boldwood (Michael Sheen), a prosperous and mature bachelor.

 

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I have add 41 HQ photos from the ”Maleficent” Premiere, El Capitan Theater, Hollywood to the gallery.

 




Juno Temple has appeared in more than 30 movies since starting her career in earnest with “Notes on a Scandal” in 2006.

This summer, the busy 24-year-old has two coming out: the refocused Sleeping Beauty story “Maleficent” (May 30) and comic book noir “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” (Aug. 22).

Both were major technical shoots, a newish thing for the English actress who, despite the occasional “Dark Knight Rises,” tends to favor down-and-dirty indie projects such as “Killer Joe,” “Lovelace” and “Afternoon Delight.”

“We did motion capture,” Temple says of her “Maleficent” job as Thistlewit, a ditzy teenage pixie who annoys her older cohorts, played by fellow Brits Lesley Manville and Imelda Staunton. “It was such a trippy experience for me because I’ve never done a lot of green screen before and this is a whole other realm of making a movie. You’re just in one big room with loads and loads of cameras, and you have to wear these strange wetsuits that are covered in what are like shiny golf balls. Then we had to wear head cameras and be on wires and stuff.”

She loved flitting about with Staunton and Manville, but didn’t get much face time with the film’s star, Angelina Jolie — depending, that is, on one’s definition of face time.

“I met with Angelina briefly, and she was so great and so cool and so lovely,” Temple reports. “But I didn’t get to do any filming with her, no. I filmed with a giant, Styrofoam version of her.”

Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller’s sequel to their superstylized, hardboiled crime drama “Sin City” also required the actors to work under green screen circumstances for demanding 3-D cameras. Temple, who plays one of the film’s many molls, is confident that the viewing effect will be totally worth it.

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Getting work certainly doesn’t seem to be a problem for Juno Temple. At 24, the pixie-like daughter of filmmaker Julien Temple and producer Amanda Pirie, has already been involved in around 30 movies, ranging from independent projects including Kaboom, Killer Joe and Afternoon Delight to blockbusters such as The Dark Knight Rises and Disney’s forthcoming epic Maleficent.

Inauspiciously, her father excised her first performance from his 1998 film, Vigo: A Passion for Life, although she made the final cut of his next movie, Pandaemonium. ‘As a child, getting to do films like that was just a great excuse to be around my dad,’ says Juno. ‘He was away for a lot of my childhood and I missed him, so that was always an exciting prospect.’

When she was 14, she told her parents she wanted to be an actress. ‘They were both pretty nervous about it. They went, “Really? Shit.”’ They were worried how she’d cope with rejection. ‘I still call my mum or dad in tears about not getting jobs,’ she admits. ‘I’m so invested in this that it really hurts when I don’t get a job I really want. And then it is extreme jubilation when I do.’

Her father, who’s known for his music documentaries including The Filth and the Fury about the Sex Pistols; The Future is Unwritten on Clash front man Joe Strummer; and Oil City Confidential, the story of Essex’s Dr Feelgood, told her to never compromise herself. ‘He said to me, “Don’t do anything unless you’re passionate about it. Just don’t. Whether it’s five months or five minutes of your time, just don’t do anything that you aren’t going to be passionate about every second that you’re doing it.” And so I really, really stick with that.’

This commitment is evident on screen. In her latest release, Magic Magic, she throws herself fully into the role of a fragile young American who experiences some kind of mental breakdown during a trip to Chile. ‘It was definitely a role that I don’t think you could be half-arsed about,’ says Juno. ‘You had to not be afraid and just go for it.’

She used to find it difficult to separate herself from her characters and suggests that doing Magic Magic that way could have been damaging. ‘God knows where I would be. I could have lost my mind and I could be anywhere right now.’ The turning point came when she worked with the director Joe Wright on Atonement. ‘He told me that you don’t have to fuck yourself up to bring tears on camera. You can get too involved with a character and that was a major piece of advice that I took away with me. I think as I have gotten older, I have got much better at letting go of a character when I finish the movie.’

Ultimately, it’s essential to remain grounded, she says. ‘It’s so important that you go back to reality and be with your best friends and with your family. I love film and I love acting but it’s about the work for me. And this is work for me. It’s a job. I don’t want it to be my entire life.’

Magic Magic is released Fri 18 Apr.

Socure




I have More Photo shoots add





The Big Profile
By Dave Itzkoff

Juno Temple enjoyed a unique childhood as the daughter of the movie and music-video director Julien Temple, whether she was dancing on stage with Joe Strummer or benefiting from her dad’s horticultural skills. “I was obsessed with ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ ” says the actress, a star of films like “Killer Joe” and “The Brass Teapot,” “and he made this giant garden hedge for me, which is short at one end and grows taller, so when I used to run up and down it, I’d feel like I was growing and shrinking.”




Juno Temple: Family are everything

Juno Temple has credited her “extraordinary” family for her acting success.

The 23-year-old actress is taking Hollywood by storm and has a string of high-profile blockbuster movies in the pipeline. The most recent acknowledgement of her acting talent was scooping the BAFTA Rising Star award at this year’s ceremony, during which she mentioned her brother Felix in her acceptance speech.

“My parents have been extraordinary with me,” Juno told Look magazine about her family. “[They] keep me grounded. I go back and forward to London and LA [where she currently lives]. My family are in the

UK, so it’ll always be my home. I take PG Tips [British tea] with me wherever I go.”

The actress has had huge success in her career, including starring in Atonement alongside Keira Knightley. She is also appearing alongside Angelina Jolie in upcoming Disney film Maleficent which is due for release in March 2014.

Juno believes she is doing well in part because she can turn on her emotions easily, and has no difficulty crying on set.

“I’m an emotional rollercoaster – I cry when I burn toast,” she admitted. “I’m a weeper! [I turn on the t

ears by] thinking of things that have made me sad. I go to some weird place.”

© Cover Media




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